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Scars Upon My Heart: Women's Poetry and Verse of the First World War

by Catherine Reilly
Sophie Ablett

Audiobook
Your battle wounds are scars upon my heart' wrote Vera Brittain in a poem to her beloved brother, four days before he died in June 1918 expressing the bitter sufferings of women as well as men in the terrible madness of the First World War. This, the first anthology of women war poets for over sixty years, will come as a surprise to many. It shows, for example, that women were writing protest poetry before Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, and that the view of 'the women at home', ignorant and idealistic, was quite false. Many of these poems come out of direct experiences of nursing the victims of trench warfare, or the pain of lovers, brothers, sons lost. Some of the poets are well known: Nancy Cunard, Rose Macaulay, Charlotte Mew, Alice Meynell, Edith Nesbit, Edith Sitwell, Marie Stopes, Katharine Tynan; others will be less familiar. But here, as elsewhere, 'the poetry is in the pity' - a moving record of women's experience of war.

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Publisher: Listening Books Permission Given by Virago
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • File size: 105018 KB
  • Release date: July 27, 2017
  • Duration: 03:40:45

MP3 audiobook

  • File size: 105018 KB
  • Release date: July 27, 2017
  • Duration: 03:40:45
  • Number of parts: 3

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OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

Languages

English

Your battle wounds are scars upon my heart' wrote Vera Brittain in a poem to her beloved brother, four days before he died in June 1918 expressing the bitter sufferings of women as well as men in the terrible madness of the First World War. This, the first anthology of women war poets for over sixty years, will come as a surprise to many. It shows, for example, that women were writing protest poetry before Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, and that the view of 'the women at home', ignorant and idealistic, was quite false. Many of these poems come out of direct experiences of nursing the victims of trench warfare, or the pain of lovers, brothers, sons lost. Some of the poets are well known: Nancy Cunard, Rose Macaulay, Charlotte Mew, Alice Meynell, Edith Nesbit, Edith Sitwell, Marie Stopes, Katharine Tynan; others will be less familiar. But here, as elsewhere, 'the poetry is in the pity' - a moving record of women's experience of war.

Expand title description text